#EmptyShelf 2016 #42: Viral Loop: The Power of Pass-it-On by @Penenberg (Hodder, 2009)

So, continuing my look at memes/virality/sharing for a new chapter for my PhD thesis-related publication, and I picked up a nice brightly coloured book that’s been on my shelf for quite some time – Adam L Penenberg’s Viral Loop from 2009 (hardback) 2010 (paperback). It’s quite enjoyable reading a book which essentially contains quite a lot of futuristic predictions, which, 7 years later, we can see if some are coming to fruition! There’s less here about Continue Reading →

#EmptyShelf 2016 #41: Memes in Digital Culture by Limor Shifman (MIT Press, 2014)

As I continue to move my PhD towards publication at a very glacial pace, my reading is focusing around the notion that Keep Calm and Carry On would not have become such a phenomenon without the ‘digital revolution’ – so I’m looking at memes, sharing, what makes things viral, etc. First up, Limor Shifman, Memes in Digital Culture. This is a really small and readable book, but packs a really strong punch in the material that it Continue Reading →

OPPORTUNITY: For agencies/employers/charities #marketing #pr #branding #advertising #digital

Yesterday, I spent most of the day putting together paperwork, and a digital presence for #BigAg16, a second year unit that I am redeveloping ready for September @MMUBS, and I’m looking for input from you guys out there… The material for agencies, employers, and charities starts: Want to help find future talent within the fields of marketing, PR, digital, or advertising and branding? Want to inspire that talent with some real world projects to get Continue Reading →

[Media] Discussing PokeMon Go & Churches with @GeekDadGamer for @BBCRadio4Sunday

After blogging about Pokémon Go: An evil for churches and dangerous for children? last week, I was invited to join BBC Radio 4 Sunday programme to discuss the topic with a rather sceptical Edward Stourton (early!) this morning, joined by Andy Robertson from Exeter. Listen to the whole programme:

[GUEST POST for @LSE_RPS] From Pokémon Go to Hashtags: How digital and social media is changing the Church

The recently formed Religion and the Public Sphere research group at London School of Economics seeks to explore the place and role of religion in British public life today. Posts on the blog explore how religion does and doesn’t matter in British public life, and how it should and shouldn’t. “The point is to know religion a bit better, not simply as believers or disbelievers in specific tenets of faith, and not simply as insiders to Continue Reading →

[GUEST POST] Is a digital presence for your church just a ‘nice to have’? for @aliveandonline #ukchurchchat #chsocm

I’ve been promising to write a blog for Churches Alive Online, ever since they first indicated that they would be launching, and yesterday morning I’d already decided that I would write about the kind of information that those searching for new churches would be looking for – I’d sketched out a bit of it, then decided to go and check out a church … which was having a service elsewhere (so apologies to them for Continue Reading →

Pokémon Go: An evil for churches and dangerous for children?

This time last week, Pokémon was entirely not on my radar (too old to have got involved first time around), then gradually material started filtering through on my social media feeds as people around the world were playing it – and I Googled to find out ‘what is it?‘ It is a massively multiplayer mobile game that uses real-world geography and location data as an anchor for its fictional narrative. If that ‘proper’ explanation doesn’t work for Continue Reading →

#EmptyShelf 2016 #40: Dazzling Darkness by @RevRachelMann (Wild Goose Publications, 2012)

So, I’ve known Rachel on Facebook for ages, and think we may have met at GWL, but now we live nearby, hopefully time for another F2F catchup! Picked up Dazzling Darkness by Rachel Mann on Thursday, and decided to read it Friday – drawn in by the intro from Andrew Shanks from Manchester Cathedral What else, indeed, is the basic purpose of God’s primordial kenosis, or self-emptying in the Incarnation, if not to invite a similar response Continue Reading →