[Publication] Collaborative Learning in Media Education

I have a chapter published in this book – just out:

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Marcus Leaning (eds), 2015. Collaborative Learning in Media Education. Santa Rosa: Informing Science Press. ISBN: 9781932886931

Collaborative learning is a key pedagogic activity in many media education programmes in schools colleges and universities worldwide.  When well executed, collaborative work enables students to learn much from each other and gain valuable experience of working in concert – a skill central to contemporary work practices in many media industries. Moreover, many media educators argue educational practices and approaches should evolve and shift better to suit the networked nature of contemporary media and collaborative learning activities can be facilitated and enhanced by the use of social media.

This volume brings together chapters from leading researchers and academics in institutions across the UK. Comprising of eight chapters that explore issues such as the theoretical background of collaborative learning, the issues involved in using social media technologies for collaboration, using wiki pages for learning and distributed collaborative learning in rural locations.

Purchase book, or see my chapter here.

Contents

Introduction:   Collaborative Learning in Higher Education Media Education Programmes

                        Marcus Leaning

Section 1      Thinking Collaboratively

Chapter 1:        Framing Collaboration in Media Education

Marcus Leaning

Chapter 2:        Programming Collaborative Leaning

Bex Lewis

Chapter 3:        Exploring the Use of Collaborative Learning in an Experientially Designed Student Undergraduate Programme: A Case Study

Melanie Gray

Section 2      Social Media Technologies and Collaboration

Chapter 4:        Empowering the Learner, Liberating the Teacher? Collaborative Lectures Using New Technologies

Dan Jackson and Richard Berger

Chapter 5:        Student Wiki Pages: Online Collaboration in a Networked Learning Environment

Einar Thorsen

Chapter 6:        Structures for Digital Collaboration and Interaction

Lisa Stansbie

Section 3      Collaboration In and Out of the Classroom

Chapter 7:        Stories & Streams: A Problem-Based Design for Student-Led Collaboration and Peer-to-Peer Teaching Across Media Practice Modules
Paul Bradshaw, Jonathan Hickman and Jennifer Jones

Chapter 8:        University of the Village
Jem Mackay and Karl Phillips

Contributors

                        Author Affiliation

                        Editor

Index              …….

Response to NSPCC Porn Research

nspcc-logo-1024x485You know that the other week I responded to the NSPCC report on children and pornography (here and here), here’s an interesting response on the quality of the research:

The NSPCC has been accused of “deliberately whipping up a moral panic” with a study suggesting a tenth of all 12- to 13-year-olds fear they are “addicted” to pornography.

In an open letter to the child protection organisation’s chief executive Peter Wanless, a group of doctors, academics, journalists and campaigners criticised the NSPCC for “suggesting that pornography is causing harm to new generations of young people”.

Read full article.

[AUDIO] DANAH BOYD — Online Reflections of Our Offline Lives

This looks like an interestindanah_photog podcast to listen to:

Steeped in the cutting edge of research around the social lives of networked teens, danah boyd demystifies technology while being wise about the changes it’s making to life and relationship. She has intriguing advice on the technologically-fueled generation gaps of our age — that our children’s immersion in social media may offer a kind of respite from their over-structured, overscheduled analog lives. And that cyber-bullying is an online reflection of the offline world, and blaming technology is missing the point.

The Bishop of London Calls for Ordinary Heroes (@Tearfund) #OrdinaryHeroes

Politics needs big ideas and less short-term thinking, says the Bishop of London, who today (16th April) launches Tearfund’s  new report and campaign, calling for a restorative economy.

This is a campaign I can get behind. Watch the video, and see the rest of the press release below.

The Rt Revd and Rt Hon Dr Richard Chartres said:

We live in a century of mingled promise and peril. The decisions we take now and the way we live now will have an impact on our children and on generations to come – for good or ill. The scars visible on the earth are the accumulating signs of a world in crisis – conflict, corruption, climate change. Yet with these crises, we have made the mistake of concentrating only on short term issues.

The Bishop of London has written a foreword to Christian relief and development agency Tearfund’s ‘Restorative Economy’ discussion paper which suggests that the development success of the past fifty years will be jeopardised by increasing levels of consumption.

Paul Cook, Tearfund’s Advocacy Director, said:

We’ve come a long way. Globally, levels of poverty have halved in the last 25 years alone. Life expectancy, health and education indicators are better than ever before, and technology has helped save millions of lives and improve productivity, especially for smallholder farmers in poor countries.

But if we don’t fundamentally change the ways we produce wealth and create prosperity, we will undo all this progress and push millions of people back into poverty.

The report argues that high levels of consumption and carbon emissions have stretched the earth’s systems to breaking point, and that the impact – already being felt among some of the world’s poorest communities – is most likely to affect people in the UK who are currently children, as well as generations to come.

There is a scientific consensus that an increase in the earth’s temperature by more than 2 degrees will cause irreversible damage to our food and water systems, inequality and poverty levels. The latest data confirms that we are experiencing a mass extinction and that the world’s vertebrate species population has declined by 52 per cent  in the last 40 years.

Calling on Christians, among others, the Bishop of London will launch the Ordinary Heroes campaign to encourage people to make small but significant changes in their lifestyles.  As well as calling for policy change, the campaign seeks to encourage a grassroots movement of people to take responsibility for bringing about change.

Ordinary heroes are people who do simple but bold things to change their own economy, says Paul Cook.

Some people will fly less or consume only fairly traded products, others choose to use renewable energy in their homes or invest their savings in ways that avoid exploiting others.

Using our power as voters, campaigners and consumers is extremely important, and part of our calling to pray and work for the Kingdom of God on earth – a world of peace, justice and hope.

The campaign draws on the Biblical concept of Jubilee, which promotes a rhythm of productivity, rest and community to counter debt and exploitation.

Read more information about the Ordinary Heroes campaign.

30 tips for successful academic research and writing

Deborah-Lupton-2Helpful blog here re: choosing your research:

As part of preparing for a workshop on academic publishing for early career academics, I jotted down some ideas and tips to share with the group which I thought I would post here. In the process of writing 12 books and over 110 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters over a career which has mostly been part-time because of juggling the demands of motherhood with academic work, I have developed some approaches that seem to work well for me.

These tips are in no particular order, apart from number 1, which I consider to be the most important of all:

  1. Choose something to research/write about that you are passionately interested in. I find that most of my research and writing tends to spring from wanting to find out more or understand more about a particular phenomenon that intrigues me. In explaining it to myself I end up explaining it to others, hopefully in a new and interesting way that is worthy of publication.

Read full post on LSE site.

Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 (Pew)

pew-research73% of teens have or have access to a smartphone; 91% of teens go online using a mobile device, and 24% of teens say they go online “almost constantly”

Fully 73% of American teens have, or have access to, a smartphone and 30% have a basic cell phone. Our survey of more than 1,000 teens finds that 92% of teens report going online daily – including 24% who say they go online “almost constantly.”

The study also finds that Facebook remains a dominant social media platform for the bulk of American teens, with 71% of all teens reporting use of the platform. Instagram and Snapchat are also quite popular with teens, especially girls. 61% of girls use Instagram compared with 44% of boys, and 51% of girls use Snapchat, compared with 31% of boys.

For more, read or download the full report.