Joining the ‘Posters Network’

Having moved to Manchester Metropolitan University, I have had a long overdue chance to catch up with Jim Aulich, who has written a number of books on (propaganda) posters. I had missed the ‘Posters Network’ being created, but am now in process of membership. It self-describes as: The Posters Network aims to make links between UK poster collections and posters specialists, and to share knowledge, news and expertise. In 2013 Arts Council England (ACE) awarded Continue Reading →

Who is the enemy? #propaganda

Chapter 5: ‘Careless Talk Costs Lives’: Fighting the ‘Enemy Within’ The dangers of carelessness were a constant theme throughout wartime posters: throwing away lit cigarettes; thoughtless fuel consumption; and wastage of scarce goods – with the biggest campaign against that of rumour and ‘careless talk’. Although a phrase largely associated with the Cold War and thereafter applied to more recent events, particularly terrorist campaigns, this chapter focuses on the idea of the ‘enemy within’. The Continue Reading →

[PROJECT] Second World War Posters

So, in clearing you some stuff this evening, I found my A-Level project on … Second World War Posters – this is where all the fun pre-BA and PhD started! Read the project (PDF) Second World War Posters Mass Communications Academic, @MMUBS. British Home Front Propaganda posters as researched for a PhD completed 2004. In 1997, unwittingly wrote the first history of the Keep Calm and Carry On poster, which she now follows with interest. Continue Reading →

[HISTORY] Keep Calm and Carry On

I’m currently scanning in some of my paperwork from what was then The Public Record Office, now The National Archives, and found the start of this interesting letter from 17th July 1939 (from AP Waterfield to Ivison Macadam): I am troubled about this Poster Question. We must get the right idea across, and so far I can’t feel that we have got it at all. The “Keep Steady”, “Keep Calm”, doesn’t, I feel sure, hit it Continue Reading →

[ABSTRACT] In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On

Topic: Uses of popular culture by religious groups The ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ poster, designed by the British Government in 1939 as a response to war, has become global cultural icon of the early twenty-first century, drawing a nostalgic response for a time ‘when we all pulled together’ in the current time of economic crisis. This paper considers what Christians have contributed to, and drawn from, fan culture around this poster, as part of Continue Reading →

New Exhibition: A World to Win @V_and_A

This looks like an interesting exhibition – and free to drop in too (subtitle same as a Maurice Rickards book from 1970)! Second World War Posters Mass Communications Academic, @MMUBS. British Home Front Propaganda posters as researched for a PhD completed 2004. In 1997, unwittingly wrote the first history of the Keep Calm and Carry On poster, which she now follows with interest. https://twitter.com/ww2poster Like it? Share it…

Public History Discussion Group Saturday 31st May 2014

I loved the Public History event I went to at Ruskin College, so please to see this email come around. Check out Wikipedia description for Public History Public history is the broad range of activities undertaken by people with some training in the discipline of history who are generally working outside of specialized academic settings. Public history practice is deeply rooted in the areas of historic preservation, archival science, oral history, museum curatorship, and other related fields. The field has become increasingly Continue Reading →

PhD Mentioned in Oxford Magazine

I met Chris Sladen at a Public History event at Ruskin College, and we’ve kept in sporadic contact ever since. In ‘Noughth Week, Hilary Term, 2014’, Oxford Magazine, Chris wrote a review of A Green and Pleasant Land by Ursula Buchan (2013), and towards the end he references my PhD. Maybe before too long it won’t be unpublished anymore… Second World War Posters Mass Communications Academic, @MMUBS. British Home Front Propaganda posters as researched for a PhD completed 2004. Continue Reading →