[ENDORSEMENT] Spirituality in Photography: Taking Pictures with Deeper Vision

I was pleased to receive my copy of this book by Philip J Richter today, which I endorsed earlier this year (publisher’s site, Amazon link): Pleased to receive this book which I provided an endorsement for pre-publication. #spirituality #photography #digital #bookstagram A post shared by Bex Lewis (@drbexl) on Apr 26, 2017 at 3:34am PDT There are a number of endorsers for this book: Vernon White, myself, Odette Lockwood-Stewart, David Holgate, Miranda Threllfall-Holmes, Roman Williams, Continue Reading →

[BOOK REVIEW] AND: Phenomenology of the End in @TheSocReview

I reviewed Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi’s AND: Phenomenology of the End, and the review has just been published in SAGE’s The Sociological Review. My review starts: Franco Berardi is an influential figure in the world of the arts, part of the radical protest movements in 1960s Italy, and currently teaches the social history of communication at the Accademia di belle Arti in Milan. A Marxist theorist and activist in the autonomist tradition, he worked extensively with Félix Continue Reading →

#EmptyShelf17 #6: Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice by Chris Barker & Emma A. Jane, from @SAGEmedia_comm

So, I’ve used cultural theorists, especially Foucault, and I’ve been engaged in studying digital culture for quite some years, but never had a chance to read a solid overview of the field, and consider some of the other options. SAGE sent me this book as a possible textbook for one of my courses, and, no, I’ve not read it all, but I’ve read enough to know that this a really helpful text to use to Continue Reading →

#EmptyShelf17 #4: What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets by Michael J. Sandel

The introduction starts strongly, and throughout the book it challenges our thinking, and what we’ve become used to as the ‘norm’ in our contemporary society (this is partly why I think history and anthropology are helpful, the help us see that life was/can be different according to different values, beliefs and social norms): The years leading up the financial crisis of 2008 were a heady time of market faith and deregulation – an era of Continue Reading →

#EmptyShelf17 #3: The Ministry of Nostalgia by @owenhatherley

The story of Keep Calm and Carry On is largely one of the 21st century, rather than of the Second World War, when it was produced. Owen Hatherley uses the poster as a hook as he investigates the ‘nostalgia’ we have for 1940s, and use it to legitimise contemporary austerity. Hatherley refers to the use of this sense by the government as NOT heritage, but, quoting Raphael Samuel, as stealing ‘from the past at random’, as Continue Reading →

#EmptyShelf17 #2: Inside the Nudge Unit re: @B_I_Tweets

So, I was clearly so keen to read this book, that I ended up with it both in paperback and Kindle! This book offers really interesting insights into the government’s Behavioural Insights Team, set up in 2010 on a largely experimental basis, designed to understand people’s behaviours and ‘nudge’ them towards healthier behaviours, and crucially, for governmental support, those that bring forward millions of £s into the Treasury. The first test to provide results was to Continue Reading →

[ENDORSEMENT] Church Online: Social Media and Church Online: Websites, by @ltreneer

Back in October 2014, I ran a workshop for CPO, encouraging staff to think about how they could use digital within their work. Last year I was pleased to be sent drafts of these books that Laura Treneer was working on, have a few (e-mail) chats about the content, and then to say: Balanced, supportive, encouraging, practical, with an emphasis on the online/offline mix. A total thumbs up! I am liking the colourful covers, and Continue Reading →

[NETFLIX] Thoughts on Black Mirror: Nosedive

I have loved the previous series of Black Mirror – particularly as it offers great content for discussions in teaching sessions – especially at MediaLit, with the insights of those being trained within a theological context, as we questioned the impact that the digital age is having on humanity. I’ve signed up for the free month on Netflix (we’ll see if I bother to extend it), and that first episode Nosedive was worth waiting for: I’m a passionate Continue Reading →