#LTHEChat: Managing Negative Use of Social Media and Cyberbullying

This Wednesday, at 8pm (GMT), join the #LTHEChat conversation on Twitter as we discuss the topic of “managing negative use of social media and cyberbullying”.. a topic that pretty much everyone I meet has an opinion on. Read the introduction to the topic (and after the event, the collected storify) on #LTHEChat. This was the most difficult chapter to write for Raising Children in a Digital Age, as there are no easy answers to what is perceived to Continue Reading →

[WEBINAR] What are undergraduate students telling us this year about their learning and teaching experiences?

Introduced by Helen May, HEA https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/workstreams-research/research-and-policy https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/research/surveys https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/research/surveys/ukes-uk-engagement-survey/take-part-ukes Presentation by Jason Leman https://handouts-live.s3.amazonaws.com/293fba2d124a403da0d35e9703389223?sessionId=2586471732310502412&participantId=200009 Application of methods not really changing so it’s a change in perception Confidence in asking questions, language barriers – expect less questions in STEM subjects Staff accessibility is important, identity other routes of communication, e.g. email, especially regarding language fluency. Not just about fluency but about cultural factors (especially feeling that they can question the tutor’s judgement). How do we encourage students that Continue Reading →

Fears for the Humanities in British Universities.

Interesting article in the Guardian this weekend – always lots to think about when we think about the purpose of the humanities and/or the way it is funded: Currently fixed in the crosshairs are the disciplines of the humanities – arts, languages and social sciences – which have suffered swingeing funding cuts and been ignored by a government bent on promoting the modish, revenue-generating Stem (science, technology, engineering, maths) subjects. The liberal education which seeks Continue Reading →

Traditional Lecturers replaced by Online Mentors?

I’m not sure if the following is dystopian or utopian… I really hope that universities still value the skills of their staff and reward appropriately – and recognise what works online and what doesn’t: Traditional lecturers may soon be replaced by networks of online mentors working for several universities, a new study predicts. In the report, titled Horizon Scanning: What will higher education look like in 2020?, the Observatory on Borderless Education suggests that academic staff Continue Reading →

Large Class Sizes Affecting NSS/Assessment Grades?

Professor Graham Gibbs, who I worked with whilst working on the FASTECH project at Winchester – writing a series of pieces for Times Higher Education – this one on class sizes – worth reading: Average school class sizes are used in international league tables as indicators of national commitment to education. And school classes of a similar size to those in UK higher education are rarely found outside developing countries. The effects of class size are Continue Reading →

An academic and proud of it?

A real challenge to think back to why we are in the academic space, the values that we need to hold onto! There was never a golden age in which academic values such as universalism and disinterestedness were not at risk, argues Bruce Macfarlane. But in an age of sponsorism and insecurity, all scholars must hold fast to the precepts that make our intellectual endeavours worthwhile Which values define what it means to be an Continue Reading →

Social Media Recruitment

Interesting news on the use of social media in HE recruitment: Social media generally reach a wider range of US-bound international students than recruiting agents, a report produced by US non-profit research agency World Education Services has found. Among respondents to a survey of nearly 1,600 prospective students from 115 countries, 56 per cent follow social media accounts managed by US institutions before making application choices and 32 per cent use social media to source Continue Reading →

Should Universities be learning from Supermarkets?

Universities are encouraged to learn from Supermarket consumer-led strategies: He recommended that institutions should embrace social media as a feedback tool and to enable “two-way communication” with students because traditional methods of complaining were out of date. “If I am unhappy about something, I don’t write a nice letter and wait for a reply. I start broadcasting to my 8,500 followers. Everyone is their own broadcaster, with their own listeners,” he said. Meanwhile, Peter Slee, Continue Reading →