Epilogger from #eFest14

I came across this piece of software at #TDC14. Previous attempts at archiving tweets, etc. from events hadn’t been too successful, so this is great – and the free version does everything I seem to need for most events at the moment (it’s $1,000 – I’m assuming per event, for premium version!). Simply sign in with Facebook/Twitter or email, search for the hashtag your event is using. If no one has set one up, go to ‘Add Event’ and follow the onscreen instructions, deciding whether you want to collect tweets just at the event, a few hours before/after, etc. People can manually add blogs, and there’s a range of other features, including a tweet wall. See the collection from #EFest14 – 100+ people from the North-East with an interest in online learning/learning technology.

epilogger

Unlimited access to 33,000 video resources now available to UK educators #PressRelease

jiscAlexander Street Press has forged an agreement with the UK champion of digital technology in education and research, Jisc, to provide access to video resources for colleges and universities in the UK using the publisher’s popular evidence-based acquisition (EBA) model.

The EBA agreement gives colleges and universities in the UK the opportunity to have unlimited access to Alexander Street Press’ complete suite of academic video titles—more than 33,000 titles—for up to one year at a time. At the end of this period, university staff can use Alexander Street Press’ detailed metrics to evaluate their patrons’ most-viewed titles and select those they’d like to incorporate into their permanent collection.

Gareth Bish, UK and Ireland sales manager at Alexander Street Press said: “We are delighted to have reached this agreement with Jisc, not only because of their dedication to providing UK institutions with market-leading academic resources for scholarly research, teaching, and learning, but also because they are highly trusted by the academic library community to negotiate license agreements for digital media via flexible business models such as this.

“We are thrilled to have their support for our EBA programme. In return, as part of our commitment to driving and analysing usage, we will be working with Jisc on enhanced provision of usage statistics for academic libraries.”

This agreement is the result of heightened interest in EBA following agreements made in 2013 with University of Dundee and Leeds Metropolitan University and will further pave the way for libraries worldwide to add the most highly sought-after content to their collections in a precise, cost-effective way.

Lorraine Estelle, executive director content and discovery and divisional CEO Jisc Collections, Jisc said: “Jisc Collections is very pleased to work with Alexander Street Press on bringing this evidence based acquisition model to the attention of academic libraries. The model has worked very successfully for some libraries in the acquisition of e-books and we believe it has the same potential in the area of multimedia.”

NEWS from #digifest14

“The digital future is going to be bigger than the digital past” says Jisc chief executive at future-gazing event

Speaking at the close of the two-day Jisc Digital Festival Jisc’s chief executive, Martyn Harrow highlighted the organisation’s continued support in enhancing digital capabilities within the education and research communities.

digifest

In its inaugural year, the Jisc Digital Festival drew together 132 speakers from the sector to share best practice on a number of topics focused on enriching student experience and boosting research excellence. In addition to speaker-led sessions and workshops, the event offered an exhibition showcasing the practical teaching and research applications of technologies including augmented reality, 3D printing and cloud computing.

The event which has already been confirmed for March 2015, gained huge participation with an online audience, attracting over 16,000 tweets and #digifest14 trending in the UK. Online participants who logged on to watch the live stream of the event represented countries including Japan, Canada and South Africa.

Supporting Martyn Harrow’s assertion that the best of digital is yet to come, keynote speaker Diana Oblinger, CEO of EDUCAUSE said: “My talk was designed to try and make people understand that although we have been using digital technology, we maybe haven’t designed our systems in a way that is truly digital, and that is the next frontier for us. Engagement is a fundamental value for learners, and there are many ways of using digital technology to enhance engagement; whether it is a simulation, games or visualisation. Digital technology promotes a deeper understanding.”

In her address, Diana also addressed the pertinent issue of higher education using data activity to monitor ‘at risk’ students and intervening with personalised support to avoid them failing their degree programme.

Other keynote addresses were delivered by City University London’s vice chancellor, Paul Curran and educationalist Sugata Mitra, who shared the success of his Schools in the Cloud experiment. Also presenting at the Jisc Digital Festival was futurologist Ray Hammond, who spoke about need to create a language of the future and how educators and researchers were in the privileged position to drive innovation and shape the digital future.

Summing up Jisc’s commitment to enhancing digital technology use, Martyn Harrow said: “Digital technology is the core, and what you can do with it is the core subject matter of the Digital Festival. It is the fastest growing, most powerful tool to enhance human organisational performance and it can do that for individuals, for teams for groups, nationally and internationally.

“The role of Jisc is quite simply to help UK education and research across the nations and the sectors that we serve, really harness and exploit the potential of technology and the fast developing capabilities of that technology for the advantage of colleges and universities. We’re at the start of the digital age, the digital future is going to be bigger than the digital past and we have to go there if we’re to keep up with that game and turn it to our advantage.”

To view the live stream of the event for free visit the Jisc website.

JISC Press Release: BiblioBoard

Looks like a good use of digital technology..


Lecturers, learners and researchers across the UK now have access to over 14,000 additional full text e-books and thousands of pages of primary source material on their tablets and mobile devices thanks to a new partnership agreement between Jisc Collections and BiblioLabs.

The partnership, which is rooted in pushing forward the digital humanities, will also empower subscribing institutions to make digital content from their internal repositories available to scholars and enthusiasts around the world.

The offer, called BiblioBoard, is available for subscription for education and research organisations. It offers two platforms to university libraries:

BiblioBoard Library is an award-winning content ecosystem that connects library patrons with digital archives from around the world. It includes over 14,000 e-books and consists of millions of pages of high-quality primary source content covering literature, philosophy, history, geography, science and more. In addition to the web version, BiblioBoard Library is available as a native application on a variety of popular tablets (iPad, Kindle Fire HD, Nook, Nexus 7 and Samsung Galaxy). Through a highly visual and intuitive interface it provides library patrons with curated multimedia collections that incorporate books, articles, images, audio and video.

biblioboardBiblioBoard Creator is an easy-to-use authoring tool that enables libraries to make available valuable digital assets in their internal repositories to others either for free or for sale via BiblioBoard Library.

Scott Gibbens, service representative at Jisc Collections says: “Jisc Collections considers this product a unique service to users, allowing them to access resources via an interface expertly designed for mobile devices.”

Mitchell Davis, BiblioLabs founder and chief business officer says: “BiblioBoard is a low cost alternative to historical databases from more traditional publishers. It allows university libraries to significantly increase their e-book collections and easily support growing demand for high fidelity tablet and mobile content. Historical books, articles, images, photographs, maps, pamphlets and documents, as well as streaming audio and video content have been expertly organised into anthologies. We are excited to be offering such a comprehensive tool set to push forward the Digital Humanities within UK institutions.”

The BiblioBoard Core content module has been expertly organised into more than 200 anthologies and will be updated with new anthologies quarterly. BiblioLabs currently offers two additional modules for purchase, African American History and Folk and Americana. Each features content from highly regarded museum collections. Additional modules will be available for purchase in the future, including Accessible Dissertations, Spanish Language History and Literature, Military History, and Women’s Studies.

Visit the Jisc Collections website for further details on subscription or contact Carolyn Morris, [email protected].

Survey shows that social media has graduated to academia

FROM JISC PRESS RELEASE:

JISCA new survey of colleges across Scotland shows that social media, and particularly YouTube, has firmly entered the learning environment as teaching and learning tools, with its use growing significantly year on year.

In the 2012 ETNA (Enhanced Training Needs Analysis) survey, carried out by the Jisc Regional Support Centre (RSC) in Scotland and launched today at their annual conference in Edinburgh, nearly three quarters of academics in further education agree that social media tools enhance the quality of the learning experience. YouTube is by far the most popular tool, while Facebook and particularly Twitter, lag well behind. However, the survey also identifies a strong need for staff training in the use of social media.

The 2012 ETNA survey is the fifth of its kind in Scotland, with ETNA surveys having been carried out for more than a decade across Scottish colleges, analysing technology in further education and able to show trends over time. In 2012, 1,700 staff took part, including more than 700 academics across 40 of the 43 colleges. Together with responses from admin and support staff, managers, learning resource staff, learning technologists, and technical and network staff, it provides a comprehensive picture of technology in the learning landscape.

Of those surveyed:

  • Academic staff seemed most in favour of social media: 70% agreed that its use enhances the quality of the learning experience and 69% agreed that students were at ease using it
  • Some academic staff felt that social media is a distraction to learning
  • Around half of all middle managers said their department uses social media tools for learning and teaching
  • Fewer than 10% of staff in any category, however, had received training in social media
  • More than a third of staff identified a need for staff training.

Of the media channels:

  • The video world of YouTube stood out strongly, used by 62% of academic staff and 40% of learning technologists
  • Other media lagged far behind, with Facebook used by only 15% of academic staff and Twitter used by just 3%
  • Blogs and wikis sat just behind Facebook at 14% and 13% of academic staff
  • Emerging platforms such as Pinterest and Flipboard were used by just 1% of academics and not at all by managers
  • Facebook was more popular among admin and support staff, learning resource staff and learning technologists than it was among academic staff
  • All social media access was still completely blocked by a significant minority of colleges.

Celeste McLaughlin, advisor: staff development at Jisc RSC Scotland said: “It’s clear from the survey that social media is now here to stay in colleges as learning tools. They offer a familiar environment for students and, at the same time, teaching staff clearly like them. In particular, the ability to share videos online has made YouTube a clear favourite. But training is patchy, so Jisc RSC Scotland aims to help college staff improve their social media skills.”

The 2012 ETNA survey, Growth and Development – an analysis of skills and attitudes to technology in Scottish further education, is to be launched at today’s Jisc RSC Scotland annual conference, Bring Me That Horizon!