[SPEAKER] Keep Calm and Carry On: Visualising the People’s War in Posters

As the ceremony from Theipval, commemorating the Battle of the Somme, plays in the background, it reminded me that I’d not posted my slides from a session I presented to the Visual Culture Research Group at MMU on Wednesday afternoon, in which I gave an overview of my book proposal to convert my PhD to publication (very slow progress, yes!). My presentation came after Jim Aulich had talked about social visual media and the persistence of images, finding Continue Reading →

[MANCHESTER] Keep Calm and Carry On: Visualising The People’s War in Posters

As part of the Visual Culture Research Group at MMU, I, and another colleague, will be giving informal 20 minute presentations based on works in progress + 20+ mins for Q&A. My abstract is: In 2016, the tourist gift shops are full of mugs, aprons, bags with the slogan ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’, or one of its many subverted versions. The poster was part of a series designed in 1939 for the Second World Continue Reading →

[CONFERENCE] In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On #fandomleics

Fandom is not an area that I’m academically particularly familiar with, but as CODEC’s pitching into this event (Fandom & Religion Conference, Leicester), I thought it was an opportunity to play with some of my thoughts about the ‘fandom’ of Keep Calm and Carry On, and look specifically at those produced by/for those of faith. These are my slides from today’s session. drbexl Life Explorer, HE/learning, Christian, cultural history, WW2 posters: Keep Calm & Carry Continue Reading →

Leicester: In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On

Fandom and Religion is an international, interdisciplinary conference. The Conference will explore interactions between religion and popular culture. How does fandom work? What is happening to fans as they express their enthusiasms and allegiances? Has fandom replaced or become a form of religion? What can the study of religion learn from explorations of fandom? I’m giving a talk on “In the World but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On“, mixing the popularity of the Continue Reading →

[HISTORY] Keep Calm and Carry On

I’m currently scanning in some of my paperwork from what was then The Public Record Office, now The National Archives, and found the start of this interesting letter from 17th July 1939 (from AP Waterfield to Ivison Macadam): I am troubled about this Poster Question. We must get the right idea across, and so far I can’t feel that we have got it at all. The “Keep Steady”, “Keep Calm”, doesn’t, I feel sure, hit it Continue Reading →

[ABSTRACT] In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On

Topic: Uses of popular culture by religious groups The ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ poster, designed by the British Government in 1939 as a response to war, has become global cultural icon of the early twenty-first century, drawing a nostalgic response for a time ‘when we all pulled together’ in the current time of economic crisis. This paper considers what Christians have contributed to, and drawn from, fan culture around this poster, as part of Continue Reading →

Keep Calm and the Green Bay Packers

Hearing how the coach of the Green Bay Packers likes to keep his team going with ‘inspirational slogans’, and this week chose ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’: And this week, with the team’s injury problems getting so bad that McCarthy seems to be getting unexpectedly bad news every few hours, he believes Keep Calm and Carry On fits his team to a T. He even had the background for the poster, which was part of a series Continue Reading →

Keep Calm and Carry On Exhibition (Textiles)

If the latest traveling exhibition at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center feels a bit different than others, that’s by design. Design, in fact, is an operative word for “Keep Calm and Carry On: Textiles on the Home Front in WWII Britain” – design of period clothing, beautifully-stitched patriotic scarves, home furnishings and more. While the idea of bringing this exhibit to the museum initially raised eyebrows — some wondered whether it was the Continue Reading →