[CONFERENCE] In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On #fandomleics

Fandom is not an area that I’m academically particularly familiar with, but as CODEC’s pitching into this event (Fandom & Religion Conference, Leicester), I thought it was an opportunity to play with some of my thoughts about the ‘fandom’ of Keep Calm and Carry On, and look specifically at those produced by/for those of faith. These are my slides from today’s session. drbexl Life Explorer, HE/learning, Christian, cultural history, WW2 posters: Keep Calm & Carry Continue Reading →

Leicester: In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On

Fandom and Religion is an international, interdisciplinary conference. The Conference will explore interactions between religion and popular culture. How does fandom work? What is happening to fans as they express their enthusiasms and allegiances? Has fandom replaced or become a form of religion? What can the study of religion learn from explorations of fandom? I’m giving a talk on “In the World but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On“, mixing the popularity of the Continue Reading →

[HISTORY] Keep Calm and Carry On

I’m currently scanning in some of my paperwork from what was then The Public Record Office, now The National Archives, and found the start of this interesting letter from 17th July 1939 (from AP Waterfield to Ivison Macadam): I am troubled about this Poster Question. We must get the right idea across, and so far I can’t feel that we have got it at all. The “Keep Steady”, “Keep Calm”, doesn’t, I feel sure, hit it Continue Reading →

[ABSTRACT] In the world but not of it: Keep Calm and Carry On

Topic: Uses of popular culture by religious groups The ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ poster, designed by the British Government in 1939 as a response to war, has become global cultural icon of the early twenty-first century, drawing a nostalgic response for a time ‘when we all pulled together’ in the current time of economic crisis. This paper considers what Christians have contributed to, and drawn from, fan culture around this poster, as part of Continue Reading →

Keep Calm and the Green Bay Packers

Hearing how the coach of the Green Bay Packers likes to keep his team going with ‘inspirational slogans’, and this week chose ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’: And this week, with the team’s injury problems getting so bad that McCarthy seems to be getting unexpectedly bad news every few hours, he believes Keep Calm and Carry On fits his team to a T. He even had the background for the poster, which was part of a series Continue Reading →

Keep Calm and Carry On Exhibition (Textiles)

If the latest traveling exhibition at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center feels a bit different than others, that’s by design. Design, in fact, is an operative word for “Keep Calm and Carry On: Textiles on the Home Front in WWII Britain” – design of period clothing, beautifully-stitched patriotic scarves, home furnishings and more. While the idea of bringing this exhibit to the museum initially raised eyebrows — some wondered whether it was the Continue Reading →

[EXHIBITION] Illinois Holocaust Museum

Hmmm, a new exhibition highlights the British experience of the Second World War by leading with the Keep Calm and Carry On poster… I really hope they also highlight that it wasn’t used: An import from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, “Keep Calm and Carry On” showcases the ingenuity and defiance of the British on the homefront during the London Blitz. Of particular interest are colorful “propaganda” scarves designed by Jacqmar scattered throughout Continue Reading →

Keep Calm: Subverted Images

Do the subverted images of Keep Calm make any sense? I’ve seen cheerleaders wearing shirts that read “Keep Calm and Cheer On.” What? Isn’t cheering the opposite of keeping calm? Isn’t that kind of the point of cheerleading? The purpose of a cheerleader is to excite the crowd into shouting, clapping their hands and jumping up and down to express their desire for their team to succeed. I would imagine that a cheerleader who followed Continue Reading →