[MEDIA] “O click, all ye faithful” in @Guardian

The other week I had quite a decent phone conversation with Harriet Sherwood, journalist at The Guardian. Some of that conversation made it into an article about religion getting involved online: In September the C of E appointed Adrian Harris as its head of digital communications to drive its strategy forward. Harris had previously led digital communications teams at Bupa, Tesco and the Conservative party. He said there was “a huge amount of untapped potential”.   Continue Reading →

Fears for the Humanities in British Universities.

Interesting article in the Guardian this weekend – always lots to think about when we think about the purpose of the humanities and/or the way it is funded: Currently fixed in the crosshairs are the disciplines of the humanities – arts, languages and social sciences – which have suffered swingeing funding cuts and been ignored by a government bent on promoting the modish, revenue-generating Stem (science, technology, engineering, maths) subjects. The liberal education which seeks Continue Reading →

Imposter Syndrome via @oliverburkeman

I’ve been thinking about Imposter Syndrome a lot recently – particularly in relation to the debates about why there are less women speakers – where I think the problems start far lower down than up in the speaker arena, and we need groups such as ‘Gathering of Women Leaders‘ who are offering spaces for women to meet together – including seeking ways to provide training/encouragement to women in the Christian world. So I had a quick Continue Reading →

Think before you press 'post' online!

This is such a powerful piece, and captures much of what I think: But Gale’s bullying and childish tactics are not the worst parts: it’s the audience, the followers, the media, cheering on, welcoming the suffering and distress of another innocent person because she had temporarily been in prior distress herself (again, according only to Gale). Cyberspace and digital platforms are not free for all spaces that have no moral repercussions; they matter, because words matter. Continue Reading →