The A to Z of social media for academia on @timeshighered, by @andymiah #socialmediaHE

I used to frequently prepare an ‘overview of social media’, but the last overhaul really went into my book (chapter 3, in case you’re wondering!). Not had time to update, so pleased to see the ‘A to Z of social media for academia‘ in Times Higher today, which promises to be kept updated: Digital Fingerprint Digiexplorer (not guru), Senior Lecturer in Digital Marketing @MMUBS. Interested in digital Literacy in the third sector. Author of ‘Raising Continue Reading →

Pathways to ‘Plod’ in @timeshighered

I picked this story out as I think this can apply as much to the arts as to science… The impact agenda rewards unoriginal thinkers and threatens to snuff out the bright ‘Sparks’ who could change the world, warns Bill Amos It seems to me that there are two types of scientist in the world: those who think mainly about doing science and those who think mainly about how to get funding to do science. Continue Reading →

Academic working hours

Recognising that I’m incredibly fortunate to be doing work that I (mostly) enjoy, I’m also seeking to find a better balance, ensuring I have time for friends, etc… The truism is true: nobody on their deathbed wishes they had spent more time at the office. What was once vaguely containable in a 9-to-5 regime has expanded, so we must work evenings and weekends. We are trapped in a structurally embedded “long hours culture”, where hours Continue Reading →

Is it worth ‘teacher coaching’ at University?

Is ‘teacher training’ at Higher Education level worthwhile? Well, as someone who’s in the Learning & Teaching Development Unit, clearly I think so! I completed my PGCLTHE earlier this year, and found it great to challenge my thinking on the way that I teach, and it’s changed my practice hugely. There’s plenty of comments on this story in the Times Higher Education: Where academics were instructed on how to teach better, Dr Robson said, peer Continue Reading →

Universities: Concentrate on overall experience, not jobs

Too much emphasis on graduate employability in Key Information Sets could play into the hands of private for-profit providers at the expense of universities, a vice-chancellor has warned. From autumn 2012, all institutions will be required to publish data on contact hours, course fees, living costs and average income of graduates, to help students choose where to study. But Janet Beer, vice-chancellor of Oxford Brookes University and chair of the Higher Education Public Information Steering Continue Reading →

Teaching Overseas: A Cultural Challenge

Fascinating insight into teaching practice from Dr Jennifer Hill, a lecturer who had a six-month tour of Iraq with the Royal Engineers as a Territorial Army officer: But Dr Hill’s time in Iraq was not just about serving Queen and country. Working with a completely different set of students made her a better teacher, she believes. “We were there doing post-war reconstruction and helping to get their infrastructure back on track,” she said. “I was in Continue Reading →

‘Work is Exhausting’ @timeshighered

Gender seemed to have most impact on the way burnout revealed itself, the study suggests. Male lecturers typically had higher depersonalisation scores, for example, while their female peers tended to suffer more emotional exhaustion. This probably reflected, the authors suggest, the draining effect on women who were having to “juggle multiple roles at work and at home”, on the one hand, and their reluctance to adopt “a distant, indifferent professional persona” on the other. The Continue Reading →

Wherefore art thou, Haldane? State plans for humanities research

“I recently wrote a post for the blog “Humanities Matter” drawing attention to what I felt was a new level of government influence over the funding of humanities research, as evidenced by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills’ research allocation for 2011-14. An article by Iain Pears in the London Review of Books came to very similar conclusions, and last week The Observer picked up the story. In its report, The Observer focused on the conspicuous Continue Reading →