WikiLeaks, Ramifications for History?

The most recent WikiLeaks disclosures, consisting of tens of thousands of reports and analyses made by US embassies and diplomatic missions around the world, may or may not lead to greater public scrutiny – and hence democratic accountability, as Mr Assange hopes – of the conduct of foreign policy. The most vociferous criticism of the disclosures has come from those most embarrassed by them, although others charge that they have put the lives and security Continue Reading →

Catching up on #Wikileaks #Cablegate

Is it justified? Should a newspaper disclose virtually all a nation’s secret diplomatic communication, illegally downloaded by one of its citizens? The reporting in the Guardian of the first of a selection of 250,000 US state department cables marks a recasting of modern diplomacy. Clearly, there is no longer such a thing as a safe electronic archive, whatever computing’s snake-oil salesmen claim. No organisation can treat digitised communication as confidential. An electronic secret is a Continue Reading →

Wikileaks

Wikileaks was mentioned on The Culture Show earlier tonight. It’s nothing to do with Wikipedia, but they, of course, have an entry on it: “Wikileaks is a website that publishes anonymous submissions and leaks of sensitive governmental, corporate, organizational, or religious documents, while attempting to preserve the anonymity and untraceability of its contributors. Within one year of its December 2006 launch, its database had grown to more than 1.2 million documents,[2] leading to many front-page Continue Reading →