JISC e-Learning Webinars: Making Assessment Count

JISC e-Learning Webinars: Making Assessment Count

Friday 3rd February 2012 1-2pm

Online via Blackboard Collaborate

Presenters: Professor Peter Chatterton (Daedalus e-World Ltd) and Professor Gunter Saunders (University of Westminster)

The objective of Making Assessment Count is primarily to help students engage more closely with the assessment process, either at the stage where they are addressing an assignment or at the stage when they receive feedback on a completed assignment. In addition an underlying theme of MAC is to use technology to help connect student reflections on their assessment with their tutors. To facilitate the reflection aspect of MAC a web based tool called e-Reflect is often used. This tool enables the authoring of self-review questionnaires by tutors for students. On completion of an e-Reflect questionnaire a report is generated for the student containing responses that are linked to the options the student selected on the questionnaire.

The session will provide an overview of MAC and highlight some of the variant MAC processes that are being developed by six different universities, as well as drawing out strengths and weaknesses of MAC. There will be a demonstration of how the e-Reflect tool works but the presenters will also show how MAC can work without that tool.  Participants will be engaged by seeking their views on the affordances offered by MAC as well as their input into identifying barriers and enablers in applying MAC in their own institutional and subject contexts.

The webinar is free to attend.

The Webinar

Joined about 20 minutes into the event after teaching ‘Social Media for Job Hunting‘. Thanks to @sarahknight for sending me the login details which hadn’t arrived! 

MACE: https://sites.google.com/a/staff.westminster.ac.uk/mace/home

Immediate reaction from staff is that the workload is likely to be high re learning journals, but find that a few comments actually doesn’t take that long, especially in comparison to the improvement demonstrated from students.

Offers the opportunity for small, but detailed, positive feedback suggesting actions… rather than “So..?” as a typical written comment on an assignment.

What should the balance be between e & f2f feedback:

My comment:

I’m interested to see how coaching practice, etc. is impacting upon how things work. With manipulating-media.co.uk we give them ‘consultancy sessions’ as a group as feedforward, before they submit their assignments, and they write reflective blog post every week. They tend to use FB to connect with each other. Agree that we should look at the e, but ultimately it’s about ensuring that it meets the needs of the course.

Some chat comments:

  • The record of what everyone says is increasingly important, a big advantage of ‘e’.
  • Is dialogue about scaffolding or about generating cognitive conflict? different processes and different models of dialogue; is all dialogue equally productive?
  • Awarding micro grades for demonstrating action on feedback

Further links:

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