I have spent much of the last 10-12 years, ever since we moved from our large home in Sussex to a much smaller one in Suffolk (not that I have ever truly lived in Suffolk), in gradually trying to declutter and focus more and more on what’s important. I feel that I still have a long way to go, but having spent last weekend in some serious decluttering (the physical space is nearly there, the electronic needs some more!), after going shopping yesterday and thinking I’m not sure that I need more… and knowing that I’m meeting with Brian Draper in a couple of weeks, I ensured I put aside some time this weekend to read his new book Less is More.

It’s been great to sit still for a while (no radio, TV) and just absorb some of the thinking. I don’t really want to turn this into a ‘task’ of a formal review, but would love to share a few snatches with you (and if you’re someone who’s horrified by people writing in their books – sorry – I’ve scribbled quite a lot on it)!

Stop living by the rule of the clock then reminded me of an image I ‘pinned’ the other day:

Source: Uploaded by user via Bex on Pinterest

 

A reminder from Steve Jobs:
  • Don’t try and fill gaps in the conversation. Stop and properly listen – will make others feel valued.
  •  The way we’re working isn’t working. We need to understand more about how we work in waves of energy, and need to look for spaces to renew energy as well as spend it. Otherwise, as I learnt with Beyond Chocolate, you’ll eat to stay awake, when what your body needs to function effectively is sleep. I’ve also learnt much more to take time to focus – I have Google docs for each of my roles, with things that need doing – pick a task and get going on it. I also used to have a rule in my PhD research – you can move something on the calendar 3 times then you have to do it!
  • Adele’s success = not selling out!
  • Find the Source of our refreshment and wisdom – return frequently to drink from it – and then let it flow through us… not trying to trap/hold it.
  • Reconnect with creation.. and an interesting piece as someone who’s trying to run… trainers are BAD for our feet … causing us to run with our heels, and doing the work our feet are meant to do. Stop STAMPING on the earth, and learn to walk lightly on it.
  • The 6-word Memoir (which doesn’t have to be for all time)
  • Take time to listen to others stories, and think how we want our lives to be defined (as a challenge we set on Big Bible to write our own epitaph – then work towards it!).
  • Start somewhere! “We cannot do everything after all. And when we realise that we can’t, we are liberated to do one thing wherever we are, and to make the kind of difference to the world around us that only we can make.”
  • Start listening to ‘what I do is me’- and be introduced to the person you were created to be.
  • Slow down and savour the moment… taste that sandwich, say thank you to the person who served it to you…
  • Learn to live with poise (from within), rather than pose (a false identity which takes energy to maintain). It’s not always about getting from A to B, but about how you get there.
  • Learn to relate to each other without an agenda, and without judging.
  • What are the passions, values and beliefs at our centre, and how do we reach them?
  • “… in a go-getting world, we may like to think that ‘the sky’s the limit’, when really our fear of flying keeps us earthbound.” We have a responsibility to be free, whatever the situation, and need to be unafraid to fail.
A reference to a great quote (as someone who has a PhD in the arts!) – acknowledged unverified:
  • We are all involved in life’s battles – fight them – but choose the right battles.
  • A soldier follows orders: kill or be killed. A warrior fights with the example of their lives, with physical fighting the last option where necessary. Matthew Fox: The true warrior is “a co-creator, a worker with the Spirit, a worker for Spirit. The warrior’s hands are the hands of Spirit at work; the warrior’s mind is seized by theSpirit precisely in the work of creativity.”
  • We tend to live in a haze … stop to see what’s right in front of our eyes:

Well, that was a little more than I intended to write, but I hope that it inspires you to buy the book.

5 Responses

  1. Um. So this is a book which talks about being unconsumerist? Presumably I won’t fall down a logical hole if I therefore make not buying it my first step in becoming less consumerist.

  2. Ha, Sara, didn’t see this comment early enough… the book is not specifically about becoming unconsumerist, but about appreciating what we do have… and finding those things that reflect who we are – at the level of the soul.

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