Twitter and blogs are not add-ons to research

The importance of social media as part of the 'impact agenda' within Higher Education: If scholars continue to have “small (vociferous) conversations amongst ourselves, in professional seminars and at conferences”, then they will soon “lose [their] place in the broader social dialogue”, says the blog, which is also published on the London School of Economics’ Impact of Social Sciences platform. “If there is a ‘crisis’ in the humanities, it lies in how we have our public…

Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains, by Susan Greenfield

A review by Tara Brabazon: Susan Greenfield is a neuroscientist with a high media profile, and this, her latest book, is aimed at the “general” (Daily Mail) reader. The accompanying publicity material refers to Greenfield as a “professional neuroscientist”. This adjective must be reassuring. An “amateur neuroscientist” would be a problem. Greenfield built her academic career on the study of dementia rather than digitisation, but this latter focus has now become a “professional” fixation. The…

#GB14 Worship Session: Discipleship and Journeying in a Digital Age

30 minute worship session, Treehouse, 9am Saturday 23rd August. (See bio) A disciple is one who seeks to follow Jesus, grow in faith, and model Christian living. We reflect upon how discipleship has been affected by ‘a digital age’: has the medium and/or the message changed? We reflect on how it has offered space to journey together, to share our stories, and to encourage one another. Discipleship and Journeying in a Digital Age for #GB14 Worship…