CODEC BOOK CLUB: How We Think by Katherine Hayles

Reblogging from the CODEC blog, posted earlier today: This week the CODEC team focused upon the third chapter of Katherine Hayle’s How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis (University of Chicago Press, 2012). The third chapter focuses upon ‘How We Read: Close, Hyper, Machine’, and certainly gave us lots to chew on. Initial comments were that we liked what was written, but found the emphasis on all the negative reports about digital as frustrating.…

WTC Theology: Week 8: A Broken World (@WTCTheology)

Thoughts from the videos from Week 8: Session 8.1: Introduction to Social Justice (Bob Ekblad) What is the Biblical basis for social justice and advocacy, and what does that look like in contemporary life? Child soldiers, slaves, prostitutes, trafficking, etc. are huge issues. Death penalty in US, homeless, prisoners, asylum seekers etc. need advocacy Biblical Basis? Gen 1:27-28 (in God’s image) Gen 1/Ps 8 (All creation EXCEPT HUMANS under human dominion) Gen 1:1-2 (God present…

WTC Theology: Week 7: Creeds (@WTCTheology)

Once again, these are my notes from the videos (not any readings) - and you can join the latest one by checking out OpenWTC. Session 7.1: The Context of the Creeds (Lucy Peppiat) How did colleges/councils seek to conceptualise faith for their time(s). 4th/5th Centuries – lots of debate over nature of Trinity/Christ (against many ideas that were plausible but wrong), as the Middle-Eastern/Mediterranean world sought to understand how Jesus had challenged much of their…

WTC Theology: Week 6: The Early Church (@WTCTheology)

I didn't get as far as the readings from week 6 onwards, but I finished watching all the videos (you can join in when the material is available via OpenWTC). Session 6.1: Why Study Theology? (Lucy Peppiat) God is creating a people and place for his presence, so creation can embrace his presence – this is what it means to become fully human. So how is this depicted in the Bible, and in the early…

[Book Review] Wikipedia U: Knowledge, Authority and Liberal Education in the Digital Age, by Thomas Leitch

This looks worth a read ... had many discussions about the use of Wikipedia within academic life ... and let's face it, many of us use it as a first stop... but as I say to students,  it shouldn't be the last stop: In this deceptively slender volume, Leitch gathers a fascinating set of narratives around the nature of authority in the academic world, based strongly on the liberal education approach of critical analysis and…
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