#EmptyShelf19: July

#EmptyShelf19: July

This month I read:

Nobody's WifeNobody’s Wife by Laura Pearson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I read Laura’s previous book, so was pleased to see the next one out. I read it in one sitting, and found it a really enjoyable read as the story evolved and we watched what we’d seen alluded to in the prologue evolve through the story – and to see the damage done to so many, including those who thought they were doing what they wanted. Recommended.

The Virtual Body of Christ in a Suffering WorldThe Virtual Body of Christ in a Suffering World by Deanna A. Thompson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I really enjoyed reading this book on both a personal and professional level – yes, it’s not perfect (what is?) – and I had a few quibbles with the sense that face-to-face is still the ULTIMATE to aim for, but the author works with young adults, researches faith and digital, and has Stage IV cancer – so lots of helpful overlaps. Well written and based within theology to illustrate that church has always had a ‘virtual’ dimension, from Paul’s letters to the early church, and it’s about understanding the strong and weak ties that hold us together, and how digital can be critically investigated.

Three Great Novels: A Sense of Belonging / Act of Faith / The HolidayThree Great Novels: A Sense of Belonging / Act of Faith / The Holiday by Erica James
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I like most of Erica James’ books so knowing today was likely to be one of very little energy (and poor weather), I picked this off the shelves. Really enjoyed it – v interesting psychological insights into the characters and found myself wanting to know what was next – not necessarily action packed storyline, but lots about why, etc!

Not sure why this has picked up 3 novels – I’m talking about The Holiday!

Searching For TillySearching For Tilly by Susan Sallis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I enjoyed this in the style of a historical saga mixed with a contemporary tale. The characters were well written (and the vicar had some good lines), and there were a few good twists to keep the narrative going. Enjoyable evening read.

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A Research Handbook for Patient and Public Involvement ResearchersA Research Handbook for Patient and Public Involvement Researchers by Penny Bee
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’ve had this book sat on my shelf since last summer, when someone lovely from WIASN was offering copies to those who may find it useful. I’m developing a funding bid which is hoping to draw on PPI (and in fact this was part of the reason a previous version of this bid was eventually turned down), and so I was looking for a clear understanding of what this really looks like. This book is written in a really straightforward style, but clearly drawn on in depth research (aka it’s not talking down) – designed to be read by patients/participants as well as researchers who are seeking to engage ‘meaningfully’ with those who will get the most benefit from the research (ensuring that they are involved from the start). Really helpful, very readable, and I suspect some terms/phrases to entirely make their way into the bid!

The Fall of Lord Drayson (Tanglewood, #1)The Fall of Lord Drayson by Rachael Anderson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was still in the mood for a bit more, and realised that I’d started at Book 3 in the trilogy. I realised I’d downloaded this at some point last year, so decided to carry on reading. Some familiar aspects to the storyline, but otherwise quite nice putting a back story to things that make part of the story of Book.

The Rise of Miss Notley (Tanglewood #2)The Rise of Miss Notley by Rachael Anderson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Well, I still enjoyed this – probably the least credible out of the trilogy, but wanted to finish all 3. Some repetitive themes from other books, but enjoyed just losing myself in some Regency country living …

The Pursuit of Lady Harriett (Tanglewood #3)The Pursuit of Lady Harriett by Rachael Anderson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

One of 99p downloads I look out for – I love Georgette Heyer and always looking for other novels that might get anywhere close. I actually really enjoyed this, characterful with a decent storyline, and realised at the end Christian novelist which accounts for it not being ‘racy Regency’ which so many of them are – and Harriett is not a ‘useless woman’!

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