Dr Bex Lewis

Dr Bex Lewis is passionate about helping people engage with the digital world in a positive way, where she has more than 20 years’ experience. She is Senior Lecturer in Digital Marketing at Manchester Metropolitan University and Visiting Research Fellow at St John’s College, Durham University, with a particular interest in digital culture, persuasion and attitudinal change, especially how this affects the third sector, including faith organisations, and, after her breast cancer diagnosis in 2017, has started to research social media and cancer. Trained as a mass communications historian, she has written the original history of the poster Keep Calm and Carry On: The Truth Behind the Poster (Imperial War Museum, 2017), drawing upon her PhD research. She is Director of social media consultancy Digital Fingerprint, and author of Raising Children in a Digital Age: Enjoying the Best, Avoiding the Worst  (Lion Hudson, 2014) as well as a number of book chapters, and regularly judges digital awards. She has a strong media presence, with her expertise featured in a wide range of publications and programmes, including national, international and specialist TV, radio and press, and can be found all over social media, typically as @drbexl.

[BOOK REVIEW] Pamela Evans, Driven Beyond the Call of God: Discovering the Rhythms of Grace, 1999

‘Religion can damage your health’, so the first chapter of this book is entitled (p11)! In attempting to serve the church and our neighbour with all our hearts and minds and strength, we can find ourselves sucked into a lifestyle which undermines our very purpose and makes nonsense of our message. It’s all easy to work the treadmill called ‘church’ until we’re worn out, and alienated from our families. To them we may have become…

[BOOK REVIEW] Gavin Calver, Disappointed with Jesus? 2005

This is a book intended for young people who ‘feel that no one quite understands what you’re going through’, but also for parents, youth workers and pastors. He doesn’t promises to provide all the answers, but to give insight into his own life – the son of Clive Calver (a ‘preacher man’), who grew up with an ‘inherited faith’, and fed up with the ‘eyes and expectations’ on him – abandoned faith altogether. Born 1979,…

[BOOK REVIEW] John Ortberg, If you want to walk on water, you’ve got to get out of the boat, 2003

I’ve heard many people recommend this book, and it’s on my list of books to read properly in the future. My mum has it on her shelf and I’ve flicked through it. Reviewers describe his style as engaging, compelling, profound, without being too heavy, and plenty of references to humour (what texters would describe as LOL humour). On p17, Ortberg summarises his challenge: If you want to walk on the water, you’ve got to get…

[BOOK REVIEW] Phillip D Jensen & Tony Payne, Guidance and the Voice of God, 1997

This is a book which I’ve been dipping in and out of for the last couple of years. The book seeks to answer questions such as: How do I know what God wants me to do? How can I make decisions which are in line with His will? If God speaks to me, will I recognise His voice? The book looks through ways in which we can discern what/how God speaks to us. P115 notes…

[BOOK REVIEW] Connie Cavanaugh, From Faking it to Finding Grace, 2005

The Christian life is one of highs & lows, but thankfully it is not reliant upon our feelings – we have to put our faith and trust in God: that if we have asked him into our lives, he has accepted us. This is the simplicity of Christian living, which we often over-complicate with further rules, expectations (from self & others), and end up feeling lost and detached from God. Within the Church, it’s very…