Search Results for: surveillance

[WEBINAR] on Digital Health with @DigiHealthGen

This evening I joined a webinar on 'Digital Health' from a Wellcome funded project. Here are my rough notes from the session:   Young people are Uusing the internet to check out symptoms, working out what can/can’t do, rather than going to the GP. Wellcome Trust project – just starting – re digital health generation. Emma Rich (sociology/education) and Andy Miah (currently in Korea doing stuff with the Olympics). Also Deborah Lupton – self tracking, quantification…

[CANCER] A few things I wish I’d known before my surgery/mastectomy #BreastCancer #BreastCancerRealities

It was only just over a month ago that I was diagnosed with breast cancer - I had a pretty good idea it was likely the week before, but it took til 30th August for tests to confirm the diagnosis. It's all happened pretty fast - one minute I was trying to finish an academic article for submission, starting to think about teaching prep, and stocking up meals ready for the start of term -…

#Emptyshelf17 #23 The Circle by Dave Eggers

The Circle by Dave Eggers My rating: 4 of 5 stars I watched the film first - I don't know if that was a good move or not, as there's some definite oddities in the film. The book's much better, and is a real challenge as to who has the power over our knowledge (very Foucauldian), although it came to a rather abrupt end which I found a little less satisfying than the film -…

#EmptyShelf17 #6: Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice by Chris Barker & Emma A. Jane, from @SAGEmedia_comm

So, I've used cultural theorists, especially Foucault, and I've been engaged in studying digital culture for quite some years, but never had a chance to read a solid overview of the field, and consider some of the other options. SAGE sent me this book as a possible textbook for one of my courses, and, no, I've not read it all, but I've read enough to know that this a really helpful text to use to…

#EmptyShelf17 #3: The Ministry of Nostalgia by @owenhatherley

The story of Keep Calm and Carry On is largely one of the 21st century, rather than of the Second World War, when it was produced. Owen Hatherley uses the poster as a hook as he investigates the 'nostalgia' we have for 1940s, and use it to legitimise contemporary austerity. Hatherley refers to the use of this sense by the government as NOT heritage, but, quoting Raphael Samuel, as stealing 'from the past at random', as…