Questionnaire, 1997

Below is a questionnaire circulated in late 1997, early 1998, to people who remembered posters from the Second World War. I got many replies, and some of the particularly interesting ones are featured here. The interviews did not materialise due to cost and time restraints, as I had so many archives to visit! Questionnaire into the memories that people have about British Home Front posters of the Second World War If there are any questions…

PhD Proposal, 1997: The planning, design and reception of British Home Front propaganda posters of the Second World War

Vast quantities of primary sources on World War Two have been released since the war, particularly in the last twenty-five years, and historians have studied numerous areas, one of which has been propaganda. The propaganda of various countries has been studied, particularly Germany (e.g. Welch, 1995, Zemen, 1964) and the U.S.S.R. (e.g. Baburina, 1984, White, 1988), with American (Nelson, 1991), French (Moody, 1989), Italian (Sciola, 1993) and Japanese (Dower, 1986) propaganda looked at to a…

Undergraduate Dissertation, 1997

This is available for inspection at Mass-Observation, Sussex University, and Department of Art, Imperial War Museum. These ideas have been developed further through my PhD work, but permission is given for non-commercial reproduction of quotations, provided that you inform me, and that attribution is given. ” British Government Home Front Posters of the Second World War: The Fourth Armament?” Dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the finals requirements of the BA Combined Honours in History…

Bibliography and Sources

Primary Sources Imperial War Museum, London Scrapbooks entitled 'Ministry of Information', kept by E. Embleton, 1939- 1946, containing various newspaper clippings (many unsourced and undated). Collection of newspaper cuttings entitled 'ATS Glamour Girl, History 1939-85' by Abram Games OBE, RDI. Selection of original posters Mass Observation Archives, University of Sussex Change No. 2, Home Propaganda for The Advertising Services Guild, [1942] FR 1, 'Channels of Publicity', 11/10/39 FR 2, 'Government Posters in Wartime', October 1939…

Conclusion

This study of the administrative context, content, and reception of these posters allows us to make a number of conclusions on the issue of World War II propaganda. These relate to the way that the government appeared not to have learnt any lessons from the First World War, although over the course of the war appeared to learn from its own failures. The government learnt to listen to the people, although they still seemed to…