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History

Recent Find: The Campaign Against Living Miserably

THE Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) is the charity partner for Cage Against The Machine, released for Christmas.

Full story, and check out the website, which leads us to another good use for the slogan:

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History

New Home Front Design Competition

As you know, I’m always up for seeing a subverted poster, or a wartime poster put to a new/clever use… so very excited to see the following competition (bit of a shame that an American poster was used for this new British campaign though):

“We are launching a competition to find the best ways in which the wartime poster and public education campaigns can be re-imagined to help today’s society understand the dangers of climate change, and what they can do to help. Wartime slogans such as “Is your journey really necessary?” remain relevant today when so much business travel could be replaced by video conferencing, for example.

Closing Date: 6 May 2011

Judges

  • Michael Johnson, Director, Johnson Banks Design Limited;
  • Emily Wood, Director of design agency REG and senior lecturer in graphic design at Central St Martin’s;
  • James Humphreys, Former Director of Corporate Communications in the Prime Minister’s Office;
  • Paul Rennie, author of Modern British Posters;
  • Andrew Simms, Fellow of the new economics foundation and author of the NHF report;
  • Caroline Lucas, MP for Brighton Pavilion and leader of the Green Party of England & Wales

Prize: £100, plus the winning design will be used as the front cover of the next New Home Front report, which will be a compilation of the best images and ideas. This will be printed and distributed, and presented to Parliament. The best designs will also appear on the New Home Front website in a downloadable form, so that people can print them off and display in workplaces, schools etc.”

See more on the website as content becomes available.

Some Related Articles

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History

Radio 3 ‘New Generation Thinkers’ Application

The Funding Award (AHRC/Radio 3)

Do you want to tell the world about your work?

In the last six months BBC Radio 3 has broadcast programmes presented by academics on subjects as varied as 16th century Scottish history, Johnsonian linguistics, Turkish literature and the history of astronomy. Its daily arts and ideas programme Night Waves has provided a platform for debate and commentary from scholars across the world.

Now BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) are joining forces to find the next generation of public intellectuals. Together they are launching New Generation Thinkers – a pilot talent scheme for emerging academics with a passion for communicating the excitement of modern scholarship to a wider audience and who have an interest in broader cultural debate.

Up to sixty successful applicants will have a chance to develop their own programme-making ideas with experienced BBC producers and, of these up to ten will become Radio 3’s resident New Generation Thinkers. They will benefit from a unique opportunity to develop their own programme for BBC Radio 3 and a chance to appear on air in special New Generation Thinkers debates and sessions.

The Submission

“Describe how your research could make an engaging and stimulating 45 minute programme for a non-academic audience.” (250 words)

KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON”: it’s a cry that has been heard around the country, and around the world, particularly since November 2008, when the credit crunch really hit, with many using it as a mantra to get through their daily lives.  Catching the mood of the nation it has been widely distributed, copied onto mugs, T shirts and student walls.

What is it about this poster, and other Second World War posters, that continues to appeal to the British public? Is it pure nostalgia, is there something intrinsically British about them, or is it just a case of timing?

As a studio-discussion, the programme would bring in guardians of some of the key archives where posters are held, including Patrick Bogue of Onlsow’s poster auctions, to discuss the questions posed above.

The programme would start with Keep Calm and Carry On: the story of those first posters, their significance, and wartime reactions.

Whilst tracing the interest in wartime posters over the intervening decades, we would discuss how the ‘rediscovery’ of Keep Calm has drawn in new audiences. We would bring in a number of stories of how the message has been subverted and reused to create new meanings in the modern age.

The programme would move on to discuss other campaigns which have been reused in recent years, including Make Do and Mend for both environmental and recessionary concerns, and other potential options to capitalise on the nostalgia, including the ‘Staggered Travel’ campaign to aid our crowded transport systems.

Awardees will know by the end of January, so we’ll see, but with over 1000 people, and not sure that my second half of the application was up to my own standards!

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History

Rosie the Riveter: We Can Do It!

Rosie the Riveter: Modern Day“Rosie the Riveter became popular during World War II when women joined the work force in support of troops serving overseas. The most well-known Rosie icon came from J. Howard Miller’s We Can Do It! propaganda poster. Created for Westinghouse, the Pittsburgh-based artist’s Rosie appeared on magazines, newspapers and posters encouraging women to join the work force. Six million women replaced the men who left for war in the factories, shipyards and industrial plants.  Michigan factory worker Geraldine Doyle modeled for the poster art in 1942.” Read about the modern day competition, and another’s thoughts on how this poster feeds into the ideas of work ethics.

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History

FREE “Keep Calm and Carry On” Book Competition Winners

Keep Calm and Carry On (Book, Ebury Press)Further to this competition to win a free “quotes” book for Keep Calm and Carry On, I am pleased to announce that the winners are as follows!

Those who discovered that Edwin J Embleton was the Studio Manager are as follows:

  • Andrew_Holt
  • SeriouslyKooky
  • Lorweld

A random selection from those who RT’d without the answer have been nominated for the remaining 7 copies:

  • JoBy14
  • Jas
  • WriterCharly
  • CheersPhilip
  • Alex_Butler
  • Peterbjordan
  • MariaBarrett