Book Review: Patriotism & Propaganda in First World War Britain

This looks like an interesting book - not reviewed by me I hasten to add: Gradually, much of the scaffolding of the influential, but historically inaccurate, depiction of British opinion during the First World War, reflected in countless novels as well as older historical studies, is being dismantled. The disillusionment of the war poets is no longer seen as typical of soldiers' attitudes and the fortitude of British society is increasingly recognised. The view of…

Kitchener: Your Country Needs You

Before 'Keep Calm and Carry On' became famous, whenever I mentioned to people that I was studying World War Two posters for my PhD, the most frequent responses was "ah-ha, your country needs you!", to which I would reply, well, yes, "right idea, wrong war"! The image, however, IS iconic, mentioned as Number 1 of the '100 Best Posters of the Century" in the 1990s, and did influence a number of Second World War campaigns,…

Seduction or Instruction?: First World War Posters in Britain and Europe

Jim Aulich & John Hewitt (2007) "This book makes a critical and historical analysis of the public information poster and its graphic derivatives in Britain and Europe during the First World War. Governments need public support in time of war. The First World War was the first international conflict to see the launch of major publicity campaigns designed to maintain public support for national needs and government policies. What we now know as spin has…

First World War Posters

"Britain entered the war on 4 August 1914.  The possessor of a small professional army and without a policy of conscription she had urgent need of more men - many, many more men - for training within the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). Thus the government in London acted quickly in bringing out a stream of recruitment posters, including possibly the most famous of its type, featuring Lord Kitchener ("Your Country Wants You!"). Other posters followed in…

Creating a WW1 Poster Online

Especially if you're dealing with schoolage children, this could be a useful site where you can get them to think about what is involved in creating a propaganda poster. The flash file gives a lot of information about what was required of propaganda posters (which I feel was using a lot of knowledge created SINCE WW1, but still, interesting exercise!). The student can then go on to create their own propaganda poster using the images…