Knowledge of Value?

Foucault, who I used as the theorist for my PhD, said that 'Knowledge is Power' (those who 'know' things' can gain power by telling others what they 'should' know)... so this story caught my eye: On the other hand, knowledge seems to command little public esteem and our anxiety about the state of it is, perhaps, evidence of decline. The educational system values skills more highly than knowledge. Technology crowds knowledge out of space reallocated…

David Weinberger: Too Big to Know

Here's a book I'm keen to read, that has recently been reviewed in Times Higher Education: The worry that we are being overwhelmed by information is not new. Five hundred years ago, the spread of printing presses led some thinkers to bemoan the mass reproduction of books and the negative impact it was having on learning. The rapid adoption of personal computers and the embedding of the internet in our work and personal lives have…

Technology impacts academic libraries

We're in exciting times... technology is changing access to materials: For the first time, a national digital library has become a realistic possibility, both technologically and economically. Such a shared service, delivering a national core collection of monographs and journals, would allow the UK to maintain its lead in delivering the best content electronically to all students, researchers and academics at higher education institutions. It would also overcome a significant barrier to new entrants to…

Blogging of value?

Interesting debate about the 'power to knowledge' of bloggers (vs) journalists... The standfirst of "You can't tell me anything" (27 October) says that "the gleefully bull-headed ignorance shown by politicians, bloggers and others" suggests that "scientific evidence and scholarly analysis may soon count for nothing". But nothing in the article supports the claim that bloggers are on the side of ignorance. What I have seen over the past 10 years is a steady increase in…

You can’t tell me anything @timeshighered

Yet the world seems to be ignoring the experts - even actively contesting them, having judged them to be among the people whose headlong mistakes caused the international economic downturn. The credibility of the intellectual classes, including academics, has come under attack in the US and elsewhere. And while scholars such as Romer may be exasperated by this new reality, some concede that they and their institutions bear a portion of the blame. Seeking to…