Categories
History

Waist Not Waste

Ministry of Food , Food Flash, 1943. (Imperial War Museum YouTube Channel)

Categories
History

Ministry of Food: Opening Night

I was priviledged to have a sneak peek at this exhibition last Wednesday (10th February), as we filmed the interview for BBC InsideOut in the exhibition, in front of the posters that are highlighted in the section with Patricia Routledge, from the opening night, with many “famous faces” commenting on what they thought of it. I’m looking forward to going back for a proper look before it closes on 3 January 2011.

“I think the graphics are incredibly bright and inspiring, so it’s not a drab wartime thing at all, and …. we need it… it’s not a historical exhibition, it’s a inspirational exhibition” Monty Don

“The exhibition is very clear about what was going on, and I’m very stunned by the graphics, the posters that were made during the time, which is something I didn’t expect” Valentine Warner

I often think about the way that my mother used her imagination to economically provide us with good meals, and of course the nation has never been healthier. And it’s very interesting seeing the posters telling us what to do from an economical point of view – we’re being told today to eat more vegetables and fruit and so on” Patricia Routledge

“The message of course, is the most important thing, and is timeless. The design work on the tea towels is gorgeous, and it’s so appropriate for now. The main thing is it’s so moving, the collective effort from the people and from the government, everyone was all lined up and facing the same way, and you feel that’s what we need now, we don’t need some people preaching at us, we need everyone doing it, and then it will make a difference.” Allegra McEvedy

Categories
History

The Ministry of Food (The Imperial War Museum)

A great video from the Imperial War Museum, for the newly launched exhibition “Ministry of Food“.  “During the Second World War, getting the most from your little plot of land was crucial. This film, produced by the Ministry of Agriculture in 1941, explains how to prepare an area of ground for growing your veg, and shows why not having space is simply no excuse.”

The Imperial War Museum can be found on Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and Facebook, so plenty of ways to follow the exhibits.

There’s a great bit of coverage in Culture 24, and I hadn’t realised until we came to the end of filming last Wednesday (for BBC Inside Out North East, interviewed by Linda Barker, don’t know when it’s going to be aired yet), that the exhibition hadn’t yet opened. The Museum has put on a display a number of it’s great Home Front posters, and a number of displays which attempt to “give a sense” of what life was like on the Home Front in the Second World War.