Changing Models of Higher Education

A number of changes, including increasing numbers studying, implementation of private provision, students paying their own way, new regions driving global competition, and internationalisation are impacting the way that HE works: Private institutions, such as the 308,000-student University of Phoenix's online campus, are taking a lead in creating "hybrid" models, which offer degree programmes through both online platforms and traditional campuses, while prestigious institutions such as Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are…

Bill of Rights for Digital Learners?

Interesting... A group of academics in North America have drafted a "bill of rights" for online students over fears that their interests are being undermined by developments in digital education. The "Bill of Rights and Principles for Learning in the Digital Age" outlines fundamental rights that students should be able to demand from universities, colleges and companies that offer online courses. They include a right to privacy, to own one's own intellectual property and to…

MOOCs causing problems?

Interesting short debate on the power/damage caused by MOOCs: "There is a risk that traditional universities will be swept away by a wave of innovation," Professor Shackleton said. "If universities do not react to (change), they will go the way of Jessops and Blockbuster, who thought their business models would last for ever." Teaching methods used by most universities were "stuck in the 19th century", he argued, adding that "degree courses are far more expensive…

MOOCs & £££s?

Interesting, contrasting experiences for a MOOC and a traditional course - and are universities likely to successfully monetise a MOOC? Musing about the contrast, I started wondering what Moocs were really about. In this I am not alone. Much has been written about Moocs, but there seems to be little by way of solid study and analysis. So I began to sketch out a research agenda for Moocs. Most pundits seem to want to know…

MOOCs still attracting lots of attention

Continuing to monitor what is happening with MOOCs: The UK's first massive open online course platform will succeed only if it can fend off competition from established US providers and challengers based closer to home, an expert has claimed. Jeff Haywood, vice-principal for knowledge management and chief information officer at the University of Edinburgh - the first UK institution to offer Moocs on one of the big US platforms, Coursera - believes that the success…