#Emptyshelf17 #20 Home by @JoSwinney

Home: the quest to belong by Jo Swinney My rating: 5 of 5 stars I first heard that Jo was writing this book last year, when she saw a blogpost I'd written for Amy http://www.amyboucherpye.com/2016/05/.... I've read this book mostly on the train, and have really enjoyed the mix of personal story (both Jo's own & those she's found) mixed in with drawing upon the biblical story of David. I've always been fascinated by how…

#EmptyShelf17 #7 Royal Fever: The British Monarchy in Consumer Culture

Royal Fever: The British Monarchy in Consumer Culture by Cele C. Otnes My rating: 4 of 5 stars There's plenty to think about in this book about the significance of the British Royal Family to British culture, and just how much that converts into both social/emotional loyalty, but particularly cold, hard cash. Lots in there about meaning and a sense of belonging. View all my reviews

#EmptyShelf17 #3: The Ministry of Nostalgia by @owenhatherley

The story of Keep Calm and Carry On is largely one of the 21st century, rather than of the Second World War, when it was produced. Owen Hatherley uses the poster as a hook as he investigates the 'nostalgia' we have for 1940s, and use it to legitimise contemporary austerity. Hatherley refers to the use of this sense by the government as NOT heritage, but, quoting Raphael Samuel, as stealing 'from the past at random', as…

BBC Radio 4: Digital Human (Series 6:2014: Episode 4: Nostalgia) #DigiHuman

4/6: Nostalgia http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04n31cr We live in a world where the nostalgia for the past now permeates our present. With online trends like 'Throw Back Thursdays', apps like Timehop and platforms which gives you the tools to make your digital image look like it was taken with an analogue camera, the internet has never seemed so backwards-facing. In this week's episode of The Digital Human, Aleks Krotoski visits imagined worlds and eras long past to explore…

Comic Superheroes!

I'm fascinated by graphics, especially those that emerged in the 1930s and 1940s, so this story in the Times Higher Education caught my attention: If you could have one superpower, what would it be? This is a popular question in team-building exercises. Flight? Invisibility? Super strength? Would you want to be able to hurl balls of fire, communicate telepathically or run faster than a speeding bullet? Sometimes we imagine possessing the powers of other animals: flying…
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