Exhibition: V&A: Memory Palace

This exhibition at the V&A sounds fascinating! The technological achievements of the recent past have already become the stuff of hagiography. After his death in 2011, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs attained a level of reverence usually reserved for the beatified. And like every saint, Jobs has his relics, including an Apple 1 assembled in his garage, which fetched nearly £450,000 at auction this May. But what if all our computers – and indeed every digital…

Book Review: Networked, A contemporary history of news in transition

Looks like an interesting read, reviewed by Tim Luckhurst, who wrote an article in a similar vein the other week: In the vortex of angst generated by scandal at News International and the complicity of Britain's political class, it is cheering to read a book that makes one feel a little more optimistic about the purposes and future of journalism. Networked hits the mark. Adrienne Russell sets out to analyse a time of transformation in the history…

Work's Intimacy, a review in @timeshighered

Here's another on the wishlist!! In a lively and compelling read, Melissa Gregg examines the impact of technologies on the work and lifestyles of employees in the knowledge economy. This book covers a lot of ground in a relatively slim volume, and considers mobile working; part-time and contract working; online team interactions; the use of social networking; online branding; and the implications of work being done in the home environment. Times Higher Education readers may see…

Review of 'Alone Together'

Tara Brabazon believes communication platforms enhance interactions when used appropriately Some books are worthy and earnest. Others sling "2.0", "digital native" or "zombie" into a title to show that the author is down with the kids. Very rarely, a book is published that plays tug of war with our beliefs. The words pull and jolt. These tug-of-war books are exceptional. Sherry Turkle has written two of them. Her Life on the Screen: Identity in the…