#EmptyShelf17 #16 The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by @RebeccaSkloot

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot My rating: 5 of 5 stars It had been a long week at work, I wanted to turn my phone off, I was polyfilla-ing a wall - and I picked this up. I read it in the course of an evening - really well written, fascinating insights into the person behind amazing medical discoveries, and plenty to think about re research ethics (one of the subjects…

Art and Technology: Can they work together?

Interesting piece from the Guardian: Technology and art have enjoyed a tempestuous relationship over the years. Fine art purists have demonstrated a wary scepticism towards the use and abuse of new technologies, and tech-heads have been staunchly resistant to art’s whimsical influence. But as the pressing issues of privacy and identity, addiction and dependency, and lives increasingly enmeshed in technology begin to create compelling subject matter for artists and technologists alike, art and tech are…

Science/Humanities?

There's space for interdisciplinarity - but is it happening? Policymakers focusing on science's utility have consigned the humanities to a supporting role, but scholars in each of the 'two cultures' understand that they share a love of discovery and capacity for wonder, says Martin Willis I thought that we had, at last, left behind the "two cultures": that phrase which, ever since C. P. Snow's 1959 Rede Lecture, has served as shorthand for a divide…

Arts, Humanities & Sciences?

Now this is a great quote, taken from a section on Times Higher Education re 'the importance of the humanities/sciences': Are the arts and the sciences as distinct as many assume? Stephen Mumford, professor of metaphysics and dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Nottingham, poses the question in a post on his Arts Matters blog. "If they are, what is the distinction? Do we have a clear definition of each that allows us to…

The Science Delusion

Having shocked myself by saying that much scientific theory is just that - theory - and that so many people like to say that science/religion can't be compatible (both run on a certain amount of faith), I was interested to see this book reviewed in Times Higher Education: After Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion comes the reply. Wham bam! Rupert Sheldrake takes on the "truth-finding religion" of science in general and "ten dogmas" of the 21st-century worldview…