Categories
Life(style)

#AdventBookClub: Day 18: Seeking Silence and Eternity

Was exhausted last night so here’s yesterdays…

I love the way that these two reflections work together:

Poor old Zechariah. A perfectly understandable wobble in the face of apparently ridiculous news and he’s struck dumb for questioning. This is, as Maggi points out, apparently quite unfair since plenty of others have encountered God and demanded proof. Sara

Not surprisingly, when he is told, Zechariah is incredulous – he can’t believe it.  He wants to know how it can happen – a perfectly reasonable question.  He knows it is humanly impossible.  Zechariah wanted some proof, some tangible evidence – I guess he got it in losing his voice!  Perhaps to hear, he needed to be silent? Pam

And Maggi notes that that silence is symbolic and deeply meaningful – not a punishment, but a response to the sign that Zechariah asked for.

Today’s instruction from Ron Glusenkamp calls for us to reshape something that appears ‘useless’ into something of value – reminds me of my friend Christina who’s very good at this:

Take a card, note or picture that you have and reuse it by sending it to someone in need of restoration.

And today @briandraper says there’s a value in those selfies…

[Jesus] can see perfectly what the poet and priest John O’Dononue managed, at least, to glimpse: that ‘behind every face, there is something eternal going on’.

Amen – and glad he can, as I think I just look shattered:

bex-selfie

Categories
Digital

9 Stories About #DigitalParenting 06/12/13

Keeping track of a number of stories relating to ‘Raising Children in a Digital Age‘ in the news:

  • n2lASIqEmotions in the digital sphere and the effect on future generations: We live in a strange age now where a large proportion of our daily interaction tends to take place online. This affects almost every generation, from children through to adults, most of whom are constantly digitally interacting with others, whether via business emails or social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook. Given how much time and effort we put into these digital portals, have you ever thought about how much they might be changing the nature of human interactions in general?
  • ‘Tis the season for marketers to think more like children: Technology has had a hugely liberating effect on the youngest in our society. Touch, gesture and voice navigation have opened up a whole new world of learning and possibility. And this has big implications, as technology has also liberated marketers to engage, excite and delight in new and profound ways. But has the marketing industry kept pace?
  • Making Kids’ Tablet Time More Meaningful: During busy times like the holiday season, many of us parents turn to our mobile devices to help manage our kids while we manage… everything else. Engaging the services of a digital babysitter is not something to boast about, but it doesn’t need to be anything to be ashamed of, either. So, how can we make the most of the time our kids spend with technology over the holiday break?
  • Tips on how to clean electronic devices when you have sticky-fingered kids: My two little angels (3 years old and 19 months) are obsessed with watching videos on my laptop and playing games on my phone. Unlike me, they are not the least bit concerned that their hands might be covered in some weird combination of chocolate and sand. Nor do they hear my pleas not to drink their orange juice in the vicinity of the keyboard.
  • New Selfie-Help Apps Are Airbrushing Us All Into Fake Instagram Perfection: Much as in real life, the only thing worse than looking zitty, wrinkled and tired is looking like you’ve sought help. If you get caught editing a photo, “it’s very embarrassing,” the 18-year-old said. “People are hyperaware of not wanting to seem fake in their pictures. As much as they edit them, it has to come off as natural.”
  • East Kilbride pupils experience the digi magic: The huge interactive touch screen table brings a whole new meaning to digital participation and makes the digital world a truly immersive experience. A key component of the Scottish Government’s Digital Exclusion agenda, the new digiTable is aimed at encouraging people to use the internet in new and imaginative ways.
  • In digital age, where do parents set boundaries?: “Technology has allowed me to do a lot of things my mother couldn’t do. My mother was gone from the house a lot. It was hard. Technology has allowed me to create my own schedule,” Shlain told CBSNews.com. But while Shlain praises technology, she acknowledges that she must set boundaries for her children, who are ages four and 10. Aside from the Technology Shabbat, she limits her children’s daily screen time.
  • Why Social Media Has Value for Children: First off though, kudos to the Academy for bringing to the forefront the debate about children and media in the digital age. We can’t avoid the topic nor should we, unless we want our kids to become the failed technology experiments perpetrated by our own fascination with all things digital. I think Dr. Marjorie Hogan, one of the co-authors of the policy, offers a valuable prescription by encouraging “a healthy ‘media diet’.” That’s a great starting point, albeit with the challenge to define what is “healthy.”

and Kobo wins acclaim from parents, too much technology for baby monitoring?, and see the technology that Santa requires these days.