[AUDIO] Podcast with @AP_Mort on Imposter Syndrome

bertrand-russell-quote

“Impostor/Imposter Syndrome is the feeling that you’re a fraud, and that any day now you’ll be exposed. You might think that everyone else knows what they’re doing, that you are punching above your weight somewhere you don’t belong.”

Read the blog from Andy Mort and listen to the podcast… and note that it’s not specific to ‘introverts’ – see some of the other posts I’ve collected on this idea as I’ve learnt to acknowledge it’s existence, and move forward anyway – essentially Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway – a book I’ve found incredibly helpful over the years!

[PRESS RELEASE] Facebook status updates reveal low self-esteem and narcissism

I was contacted by ITV This Morning yesterday to discuss  the possibility of being on the programme to discuss the following story (ITV Player programme here – they decided to go with another psychologist, rather than a social media specialist):

personalityPeople who post Facebook status updates about their romantic partner are more likely to have low self-esteem, while those who brag about diets, exercise, and accomplishments are typically narcissists, according to new research.

Psychologists at Brunel University London surveyed Facebook users to examine the personality traits and motives that influence the topics they choose to write about in their status updates – something that few previous studies have explored.

The data was collected from 555 Facebook users who completed online surveys measuring the ‘Big Five’ personality traits – extroversion, neuroticism, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness – as well as self-esteem and narcissism.

The research found:

  • People with low self-esteem more frequently posted status updates about their current romantic partner.
  • Narcissists more frequently updated about their achievements, which was motivated by their need for attention and validation from theFacebook community. These updates also received a greater number of ‘likes’ and comments, indicating that narcissists’ boasting may be reinforced by the attention they crave.
  • Narcissists also wrote more status updates about their diet and exercise routine, suggesting that they use Facebook to broadcast the effort they put into their physical appearance.
  • Conscientiousness was associated with writing more updates about one’s children.

Psychology lecturer Dr Tara Marshall, from Brunel University London, said: “It might come as little surprise that Facebook status updates reflect people’s personality traits. However, it is important to understand why people write about certain topics on Facebook because their updates may be differentially rewarded with ‘likes’ and comments. People who receive more likes and comments tend to experience the benefits of social inclusion, whereas those who receive none feel ostracised.

“Although our results suggest that narcissists’ bragging pays off because they receive more likes and comments to their status updates, it could be that theirFacebook friends politely offer support while secretly disliking such egotistical displays. Greater awareness of how one’s status updates might be perceived by friends could help people to avoid topics that annoy more than they entertain.”

The research team said further studies should examine responses to particular status update topics, the likeability of those who update about them, and whether certain topics put people at greater risk of being unfriended.

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Academics used the 35-item Berkeley Personality Profile to measure the ‘Big Five’ personality traits; the 10-item Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale to assess self-esteem; and the 13-item Narcissistic Personality Inventory to measure narcissism.

The research also suggested the following:

  • Extraverts use Facebook status updates as a tool for social engagement
  • Neurotic individuals use Facebook for validation – to win the attention and support they lack offline
  • People high in openness use the platform primarily to write about current events, the arts, or their political views rather than for socialising

‘The Big Five, self-esteem, and narcissism as predictors of the topics people write about in Facebook status updates’ by Tara C Marshall, Katharina Lefringhausen and Nelli Ferenczi is published here.

#TDC15: 7679 Total Tweets (So Far)

epilogger

I quite enjoyed finding epilogger a couple of years ago, neat (free) way to collect tweets into one place (sure the paid version has all kinds of exciting features!) … so here’s the tweets from Thinking Digital: a conference for those curious about how technology is shaping our future (so far 8 years Newcastle based, but with an event coming in Manchester in November).

 

[WORKSHOP] Social Media Masterclass with London Witness

London Witness is a new initiative, flowing out of Capital Vision 2020, to encourage more positive and proactive engagement with the whole range of media, from newspapers and television to blogs and social media. We want to train and equip a small group to change the public conversation about God in London. Those selected will have the potential to communicate well about Christianity and what it means in their daily lives.”

I was invited to run one of their sessions, and here’s the material from today:

[ARTICLE] Little Gamers in @ChildrensworkMag

childrenswork-mag

Smart phones and tablets have placed gaming at the centre of our society. You don’t need to spend long on public transport to see someone playing ‘angry birds’ or ‘2048’, but what does this mean for our children? Are video games evil or could they help child development? Dr Bex Lewis investigates…

 I still remember the excitement of my first go on a very basic game on a BBC computer (the one with the red button) at primary school in the 1980s.

Subscribe (or free 30 day trial) to read full article.

[SPEAKER] Children, Church and the Digital Age Conference (4th June 2015)

Raising Children in a Digital Age – Day Event
4th June 2015 @ City of Edinburgh Methodist Church
Time: 10am-3.30pm
Cost: £12.50 includes lunch and refreshments (and free access to evening programme 7-9pm)
Evening programme only is £5 (book on separate link)
Speaker: Dr Bex Lewis

Whether you are a church leader, children’s ministry practitioner, or someone trying to resource your church in this area, you may feel the responsibility for helping keep children safe online but also want to know how they and you can use it to its full advantage.

In this day course, developed from Raising Children in a Digital Age (Lion Hudson, 2014), internet scare stories and distorted statistics are put into context, clear and sensible guidelines are offered. You’ll have the opportunity to discuss your hopes, fears and experiences with others in a similar situation, and study examples of how others have used social media successfully with children and young people.

[VIDEO] What effect is the digital revolution having on our everyday lives?

[BOOK REVIEW] This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things (re online trolling)

30596_This-is-Why-We-Cant-Have-Nice-Things-Mapping-the-Relationship-Between-Online-Trolling-and-Mainstream-Culture-by-Whitney-PhillipsThis looks really interesting:

Why do trolls exist? How can such hostile online behaviour be understood intellectually, culturally and socially? Put another way: is the notorious Pedobear character “lulz” (hilarious) or an ambivalent tour guide through child pornography?

For her recent doctorate, communications scholar Whitney Phillips conducted an ethnography of these groups by entering the trolling subculture. Drawing on that research, This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things considers whether trolling is a deviant subculture or a more universalised online practice. As is common in digital media studies, while Phillips argues for the generalisability of trolling attitudes and practices, her dataset is restricted to the US.

Her book, which will be useful for theorists of digital ethnography, considers the subcultural origins of trolling (2003-07), its golden years (2008-11) as well as a transitional period (2012-15). Phillips is concerned with “the self-identifying, subcultural troll”, drawing a distinction between these practices and simple online cyberbullying. Her challenge was to study this community but not to “replicate trolls’ racist, sexist, homophobic, and ableist output”, which prompts a wider intellectual question about how to create a space for researching social patterns that cause harm to others

Read full review, and see piece I wrote on social media trolling last year.