Recent Find: Get Excited and Change Things

Keep calm and carry on was the message for people in Britain during World War II. I like get excited and change things better. As fun as that is, though, the thing about change is that when it gets personal, most of us don't actually like it. That's why it's easier to work on change in small doses. How can we take one tiny step towards something new? Read more.

Keep Calm and Campaign On @bbcbreakfast #Keepcalmandcarryon

This morning on @bbcbreakfast (8.20am), the story was broadcast re Mark Coop's (successful, so far) attempt to trademark 'Keep Calm and Carry On' within the EU (as applied to the items he sells: t-shirts, mugs, etc.). Mark Cooper owns keepcalmandcarryon.com, which as you can see has capitalised hugely on the slogan: On TV this morning he said: Having quit the day job, and put my life and soul into this, and build it up, and…

7 reasons to keep calm and carry on

1.  Decorum. Because a hubbub or a brouhaha would be unseemly. 2.  Because You’re British. It’s what’s expected of you.  It’s what comes naturally.  Your reaction to an unforeseen and potentially frightening event should be one of unflappable fortitude and apparent indifference.  No flapping.  Got that? 3.  Consequences. If you should flap then someone with a plummy voice will be forced to administer a swift slap and command you to “pull yourself together”.  That constitutes a scene.  No one…